Deviant Login Shop  Join deviantART for FREE Take the Tour
Woot!! 

Worked on both, one more than the other.

Pocketgunfighters
itunes.apple.com/us/app/pocket…
I built all the levels, lot of the characters, lot of the ui, etc. 

Snowboarding game 
play.google.com/store/apps/det…
I did the icons and portraits. Sad Raccoon is even in there. 
  • Mood: Joy
  • Listening to: sleigh bells
  • Reading: spook country
  • Watching: youtube
  • Playing: pocketgunfighters
  • Eating: sushi
  • Drinking: water
Well I must be doing something correct. 
my first time someone has stolen my work
to go make money! woot! O_o

teespring.com/derbygirl

thanks to the Los Angeles Renegades for
looking out for me. they rule! 


Update

So I emailed the contact email and got
a "talk to our legal dept" response.

legal@teespring.com



The have a FAQ on how to report a IP violation.
This required a PDF doc, signature, and proof of ownership.
Did that. (actually still have the original so I took 
a picture of it in front of the email on my screen)

Got a response that I needed to prove "you used the design in commerce prior to the start of the campaign"

So I sent proof of my comic-con booth from 2013 and the prints that are for sale. 

No response yet. 


Update 2

With no response I decided to get a lawyer involved,
I emailed them telling them that due to a lack of response
this was my next move.

They replied that I had not given enough proof of prior commerce.

I got home late, had a beer, and decided to jump through the hoop before giving it to the lawyer.
Having to proof that someone is doing something that they know is wrong made me feel like an idiot.




I took a picture of my artbook, 

took a picture of the book open with the copyright date. 

took a picture of the page in the book with the image.

found pictures of my table at the con (SDCC 2013) with the book and
displaying the table number and my company name. 

linked to the cons website with the table number and my company name 

found another photo of my set up at a different con (APE 2013) with the book. 

took a photo of an ad I took out in the cons guide book with the image and the table no. 

linked to the website showing that table number and my company name matched. 




no response, no, we are sorry, or, acknowledgement. nothing. Not even a boiler plate, it has been pulled.
This is how teespring treats artists, with contempt 
and with not a shred of respect. 


but the website was finally pulled. 








Well what a year. I'm sure you're being flooded with looks back, and I'm going to do my own just because...

Keeping just to the art side, it's been a pretty nice year. The video game biz has treated me well, working with a great bunch and shipping a couple iOS games. I got my first pro job in comics, a cover for Sonic Universe (variant for issue 60) and a follow up for Megaman. Seeing something I drew in Previews kind of blew my mind. 

The CA Con circuit (BigWow, SDCC, APE) treated me well. I got amazing feedback from Brian Stelfreeze, Terry Moore, and Eric Larsen. Sales where well enough to help pay for itself, and I managed to finish a new art collection and a new issue of Native Drums. 

We got a green light from Comixology, cmxl.gy/1cnRSzL and started running on Tapastic. tapastic.com/series/Native-Dru… so the digital front is moving. 

I'm pretty happy, I think this is a good launching platform for 2014. 

Happy New Year everyone! 

-Vince





cmxl.gy/1cnRSzL

Issue one of Native Drums is up on Comixology. I feel like this comic book hobby thing is almost working for me! 





  • Listening to: brick+mortar
  • Reading: megaman
  • Watching: kill la kill
  • Playing: need for speed rival ps4
  • Eating: bloody mary tri tip
  • Drinking: rum

APE 2013

So the con went pretty well. It's the last year for APE in the concourse, I hear its being torn down for condos. I think we all gave the building a good send off.

Overall the con was a hair slower for me this year than last. It might be due to me not being in full sales pitch mode(which I find sort of tiring), or that I just didn't have enough new stuff. Hard to say. 

There was a lot more "craft" stuff this year than previous. Knitting, sculpture, stuff like that. The quality of the vendors seemed higher than in any previous year that I've gone. Amazing to see how many people are doing comics. 


Friday I hit the last gasp party with Scott. It's an office/warehouse with all of their stock. Imagine a cozy old building with the most odd ball collection of circus posters, books and porn. your not even close. any ways. I saw "guide to troubled birds" which I am now kicking myself for not buying. It made me laugh so damn hard. Upon leaving we found John and Dawn (and a third guy that I can't remember his name for the life of me, but had made this amazing book that was 15 feet long) I know that sounds like a fevered dream….


I spent friday evening making a load out of stuff and packing it into my slightly crunching wrx. I did finally get another trunk cover so I can actually, leave stuff in the trunk without it being advertised. 


Sat morning it was off to the show, I read that the show floor opened to the public at 11. It takes me only 10 minutes to set up my booth, but being used to San Diego, and how the show floor really opens an hour earlier than they say, I was ready to go by 10! 


....and then I waited till 11. haha


Al Gordon swung by which is always cool. As did fellow workshop students, Kimo and Leno. Lot of co-workers and former co-workers swung by, and some returning supporters. There is a whole cast of characters that I tend to only see at cons. Ted, (Puma Press) Rachel (Poser ink), Emo, though no Cody this year. The list goes on and on. One of the cooler parts about doing the same shows. Also got to chat with one of the Tapastic guys. kinda neat. Chelsea came by with her book that she had wrote. no really, we are talking game of thrones size tome. It was only a year ago I was talking to her at the last APE and she was writing it. I wanted to do some sketches of her characters. So a year later, I didn't get a single sketch for her done, but she wrote a freaking epic. so darn cool.


Sunday was slow for me, but I had a good time. I got to run around a bit, drink some beers and take in the sights and the sales pitches. Didn't pick up a whole lot, but did get to chat with some of the gals who did smut peddler, along with other cool comics. Spike wins the award for most energy of anyone on the show floor. Kelly brought her sketchbook by my table which was really inspiring. There were so many cool interactions that I can't name em all. Did a hitgirl sketch, inked a page of native drums, sold some prints. all and all a great show. 


Next year the show is in Fort Mason, which should be exciting. I have got to get the ball rolling faster on some new projects! I've got some ideas....


  • Listening to: cooling fan
  • Reading: fame and misfortune
  • Watching: fletch
  • Playing: hawken
  • Eating: cereal
  • Drinking: water
APE is this weekend,

 I'll have a table.

edit: APE is the Alternative Press Expo held in San Francisco. www.comic-con.org/ape
I'll be at table 312 on the lowest portion of the show floor close to the middle. swing by, say hi, tell me you know me from dA. ask me to sketch ya something. 


end transmission. 






So I did a variant cover for an upcoming comic (more info when I see it show up in previews), and I have a piece in a steampunk comic. Its been crazy busy the last month or so, but its great to get paid for doing this stuff. Feels more like a job and less like me goofing off at night at the drafting table. Couple that with a full load at work doing zbrush and 3d stuff and its been a very creative few weeks. 

on a side note....

I'll also be at APE in San Francisco next weekend. swing by and harass me. I'll be on the main floor somewhere in the middle of the hall. Look for the native drums banner....where agent is actually taller than I am....which kind of freaks me out...seeing something I've draw larger than I am....


well....I did some portraits and stuff for it. No environment or character art from me on this one (I was on another project) but it is cool to see my drawing as the icon ^___^ Somehow I managed to avoid working on another skateboarding game. I've worked on 5 over years and that's not counting other "xtreme" sports titles! geesh.... 

anyways check it out, if you have some time. It's free to play (you have to buy a cheap skateboard at the start, but we give you the money for that) 


play.google.com/store/apps/det…



I met this nice gal from Tapastic at SDCC and decided to give it a shot. It's comic publishing but in sort of bite sized chunks for phone and web.

 I'm still sort of working out how best to format my stuff for it, as I think just taking print pages as is doesn't quite give the smoothest storytelling with it. 

The cool thing though, is I can sort of publish some stuff as I go instead of waiting for a complete 23 pages to be finished. 

It's worth checking the site out if you haven't, and I'm located....

tapastic.com/series/Native-Dru…




punchyninja.tumblr.com/

shocking. I can't spell my own freakin name.  I had misspelled my tumblr, "punchyinja"

 Its fixed now.

 eeesh.

oh yeah....and the facebook ....





  • Listening to: tron
  • Reading: akira
  • Watching: the wire
  • Playing: dragons crown
  • Eating: chips
  • Drinking: water
So I got the word that I did in fact get a table at APE for this year. www.comic-con.org/ape Oct 12-13th.

Table 312 (were I was last year! ) listed as 17machine studios. 

I've got some time to put together some new stuff, and I'll have "the maybe new to you" stuff from San Diego as well. That is, if you didn't see me at SDCC. So new prints, a new  sketchbook, issue 4 of Native Drums, etc. 

I love APE, its my favorite show, really good scene for writers and artists and it gets bigger every year. I'll post more as it gets closer (as Oct feels like its years away=) 






  • Listening to: silence
  • Reading: akira
  • Watching: the wire
  • Playing: dragons crown
  • Eating: chips
  • Drinking: water
Six years ago we lost Mike, I met him only once, but he had a large impact on me as an artist. So much so it really rattled me when he passed. 

I went to the same college as Mike, He graduated years earlier, but his career had taken on a sort of myth like quality. At my school you could major in illustration, but you could NOT focus in comics. If there was even a hint of comic work in your portfolio you could be turned down from admittance. Once in, it was frowned on to do any assignment with a comic book style. 

I remember the rumors of a student that had gotten out and made it in comics. Who had gone the path of the fashion dept, but had turned the skills learned into a gig on the Flash. 

Near graduation he came and gave a talk at the school. He talked about how difficult it was after graduation, how he had to make his portfolio from scratch, and working in a grocery store instead of doing art. As silly as it sounds, It was really helpful for me at that time to hear that if things didn't happen quickly after graduation, it doesn't me the game is up. 

He drew Spider-Man in sharpie on a big white pad for the people at the talk, and afterwards he gave me the sketch. Such a cool guy and huge inspiration. 

If you don't know Mikes work, you should check it out , www.mikewieringo.com/ Someone said that "he made it look easy" and that sums it up perfect for me. He made comic art seem like something that was fun and not some impossible task.


  • Listening to: jack hammer
  • Reading: AvX
  • Watching: the wire
  • Playing: breach and clear
  • Eating: yogurt
  • Drinking: Coffee

SDCC

I survived San Diego Comic-Con. This makes my fifth year in a row working a small press table. Because the show is 5 days long (with preview night) at some point I forget what normal life is like and begin to just believe that this is what I will be doing everyday for the foreseeable future. Then, bang, the con is over and everything is back to normal. It's kind of startling. 


What went right

We drove down on Weds morning, got up at 4am and left around 5:30. That put us in SD (and not in LA rush hour) around 3:30. We borrowed a friends SUV which allowed us to have way more room than my car. It was an exhausting drive, but we didn't get stuck in traffic =)

The new table location was amazing! we got an end cap which is not unlike being on the isle seat in an airplane. Getting in and out of the booth becomes very easy. The added exposure for our banner is also very nice. Lot of people took pictures of it, and even posed in front of it. 

Sales where stronger this year on the comics, weaker on the art books. I think it has to do with to many choices. I do an art book every year and even with being out of some of the older ones thats still like 6 books. 

People seemed to like Native Drums, had several people pick up issue one and come back for the rest. The prints did really well. Having them in bags and boards and removing the prints that don't sell helped a lot. plus I had like 10 new ones. 

I got to meet Terry Moore and get a crit. He was very nice, gave me some great feedback and showed me his original pages for SiP. Really was the highlight of the show for me. 

Had several Roller Derby gals, and one guy, swing by. Learned a lot about the sport from chatting with all of them. I got an amazing team shirt from the team I did a logo for. It's pretty sweet. even has my company name/number on the back!

Sunday night at 2:00 am Steve Leialoha swung by the hotel bar and chatted with me and my friend for over an hour. He showed us his sketchbooks and talked about all the people he has met at comic-con over there years. It was the perfect way to end the con. 



Things from the other side of the table.


So some stuff you start to notice running these tables. For the most part people are amazing, but on rare occasion you'll get some behavior that is perplexing. 

-thank you guy that likes to set his food/drink down on the table, or better yet, on your artwork. extra points if you don't take it with you when you leave. 

-thank you dude that reads all 4 books, then leaves.

-thank you people that flip through the portfolio as if trying to destroy it. flipping with such distain and force that I wonder why you hate me. extra points if you leave the portfolio on a blank page or closed. 

-thank you guy that got a lot of trash/swag and decides to leave it on the table. 


Well now that I got that out of my system, wheeee, I have to say the con went really well and I had a darn good time. Thanks to all that stopped by. no really, thanks. I'm not complaining anymore! I loved seeing you all. 




  • Listening to: wait wait don't tell me
  • Reading: wierd war tales
  • Watching: game of thrones
  • Playing: last of us
  • Eating: eggs
  • Drinking: Coffee
SOoooo we are in final approach for San Diego, I'll be at table K-08 in small press.

17machine studios K-08

 This number will not help you at all. Only isle numbers can be seen on the show floor and row/letters are on a piece of cardboard that is promptly covered up by every vendor. And the isle numbers aren't on the map they give you. 

Its at the back of the hall inbetween B1  and  B2. Those are giant letter numbers you'll see out front.

around isle number 5600 (giant banners that hang from the ceiling) 

You must come by. say hi. ask me to sketch you something. tell me you know me from dA. bring your friend that only wants to go to hall H. Bring your other friend that is odd, and you pray doesn't speak to people. 




  • Listening to: Kimbra
  • Reading: the massive
  • Watching: Jeremiah Johnson
  • Playing: Hotline Miami
  • Eating: corn beef
  • Drinking: Coffee
Thanks to everyone for the good birthday wishes. It was very cool of ya all! I fired up my old Mustang and drove down the coast for the day. It was very nice.

thanks again!!

-Vince
  • Mood: Joy
  • Listening to: fan on my loud ass laptop
  • Reading: Chuck Jones the dream that never was
  • Watching: new leaf
  • Playing: remember me
  • Eating: yogurt
  • Drinking: coffee
Well I survived another con. It went very well and I got to see many folks that I haven't seen in awhile. Thanks for stopping by, you all know who you are! =)

Sat I got in early (as I didn't know which part of the con hall we were in, where to get the badges etc) and I wanted to get a decent parking spot. Well all the parking was already full, but there was no one walking around the convention center.....how...odd...then I realized there was a marathon in San Jose that morning. ugh. Makers Fair was also going on and bay to breakers. Way to much going on.

The con was a decent size, maybe a bit bigger than the Image con, waay smaller than Wondercon or even APE. We had a good table location, across from some very friendly gals that were selling corsets and next to a school teacher that was so amazing with the kids in costume. The intercon was annoucenments gave the whole thing an Altman M.A.S.H feel, and R2D2 was screaming the whole time. (I assumed he was upside down somewhere with his feet being burned.)

I got to talk to Michael Golden for a bit, he was so nice and told me a bit about his inking. Terry Dodson was super cool as usual and had a huge amount of his original pages at the table to look through. I learned a bit from being able to flip through those. I got to watch Steve Leialoha draw. I always feel so relaxed watching him, its just this easy going fluid act, as if the pen is just moving on its own. Brent Anderson was super nice, poor guy got his car broken into and several portfolios of original pages snagged. ugh.

The amazing thing though, the real highlight, was my wife commisisioned Brian Stelfreeze to paint a Lee Marvin portrait for me. It came out amazing! AND I got an great crit from him that was very clear and gave me a lot to work on. Well worth the trip down there just for that!

well back to work, got to get some stuff done for Comic-con in San Diego.
  • Mood: Joy
  • Listening to: fan on my loud ass laptop
  • Reading: Mara
  • Watching: leathal weapon 2
  • Playing: DOA5 on vita
  • Eating: cereal
  • Drinking: coffee
I'll be at Big Wow in San Jose table AA158, way in the back and to the right in some sort of island of artist alley tables....listed as 17machine studios.

I haven't done this show in years, it used to be called Supercon, and it wasn't so super sales wise for me. I don't think I sold anything that weekend. There is nothing quite like the feeling of setting up at one of these gigs and no one liking your junk. But before I could feel sorry for myself I did Fanime the very next weekend in the same building and did gangbusters in sales. So who knows.

With no Wondercon this year (yeah, yeah, I know they are calling something Wondercon that is down south....I'm just bitter they moved my favorite con) I'm hopeful that Big Wow will have a decent draw....of course as a backup plan, I could always do Fanime which is once again, the very next weekend in the same building....

anyways, swing by if ya can. the guest list is insane, probably one of the best I've ever seen for a con this size.
  • Listening to: garbage truck
  • Reading: Batman
  • Watching: stalag 17
  • Playing: spec ops : the line
  • Eating: yogurt
  • Drinking: coffee
I'm paraphrasing, but I read this book on self publishing by Dave Sims years ago. In it he mentions that he doesn't want to hear about "your" comic book story until you hit a 100 pages. I remember thinking this sounded harsh, but over the years as I met person after person that had "a comic book they were working on" that was really a couple character sketches, or a world bible, or even a few pages, I kind of understood what he was saying. Sort of a put up or shut up call to arms. Comics are hard, and doing them on the side makes it even harder.

It reminded me of that Family Guy bit, the one about Brian writing his novel.

So years went on, and I never drew a comic. As long as I didn't attempt to draw it, it was something that was possible. If I tried and failed then the dream could be dead. As twisted as that sounds.

Eventually I signed on to help a writer with an action story, 10 pages. Just 10 pages so he could go pitch it. Not even a full issue. Good lord was that hard. Those 10 pages, and in the end it burned the relationship with the writer, and made me feel like I had in fact failed.

So I eventually got back on the horse so to speak, and had a friend write Native Drums. He set me up for success, few characters, little backgrounds, as if he were budgeting a movie, and we had no money.

Even with that set up it took me forever to finish. I pushed through because I didn't want to fail again. I wanted to say that I had at least drawn "a" book. 23 pages.

It took me forever, and I shelved it several times, but I finished, and while it felt great, that Dave Sims quote sat in the corner of my mind. Looking grumpy. The veteran fighter pilot not impressed that I managed to take off and land once. With each issue I completed, 2, and 3, I still had this feeling. I had not completed the challenge.

So flash forward. I just finished issue 4 of Native Drums. The excitement of which sparked a new moment of realization. how many pages had I done? The book is not exactly orthodox in its page count, could it be 100? Had I done it? Was I now actually in the game?



I counted them up...not counting pin-ups, letter columns, etc. 93,94,95....95....95....

fuuuuuuu

so yeah, on to issue 5....and 100 pages, which is far harder than I thought it would be, but so damn rewarding ^____^
  • Listening to: my computer fan
  • Reading: x-men
  • Watching: steel helmet
  • Playing: tomb raider
  • Eating: yogurt
  • Drinking: coffee
So I got a table at Bigwow, SDCC and plan on hitting APE. The con scene is one that I love, but its also something I have to balance with how much it can cost. I think 3 is the max I can do, and SDCC is so crazy expensive to attend that every year I swear I'm not doing it again. lol, and yet here we go!!!

The goal is to have another sketchbook collection, Native Drums 4, Native Drums 5, and maybe Trade Credit (if I can get a printer to let it go through, or if not, I'll do an ashcan all old school style=)  

I'm thinking of looking into doing a hardcover artbook collection, but I'm not sure yet.

This is all stuff I do on the side, my day job is in video games and this is just stuff I do because I love it. It almost pays for itself, but the goal has always been one of learning and having a good time. So thanks for all the support and patience! I love working in games, but I don't think I could do it as long as I have without having the comics and sketching to keep me sane.

-Vince
  • Mood: Neutral
  • Listening to: hybrid
  • Reading: batman
  • Watching: flash gordon
  • Playing: ni no kuni
  • Eating: pizza
  • Drinking: coffee
Eric Larsen

So I not only got a chance to meet Eric Larsen, but also to get a crit from him on my comic pages.

Before I get into what he had to say, and how cool it was, let me back up and talk about critiques,  and me.

Many years ago I got a very nice critique from Colleen Doran. I knew Colleen from the comic shop I worked at, and it was amazing of her to take the time and give me her objective and professional opinion on my work.

Being young and stupid, I took it way to personal. As if it were an assault on me, and as if she was trying to be mean.

At that time I worked in an amusement park in the summer as a caricature artist. in 5-10 minutes in marker I had to draw a caricature of a total stranger and make them like the drawing. If they did NOT like the drawing they could refuse to pay, and demand another artist draw it. This rarely happened. maybe once or twice a month, but it was brutal. It would take me weeks to fully recover. To me a crit was either you liked it, or you hated it, and the hated it part had usually come with "and I want this other artist to draw it instead!"

So I've spent years meeting professional artists and NOT asking for a critique. Which is really silly, as I have sense matured emotionally, given and had critiques in art school, and for over a decade in my day job had to be art directed or art direct.

I'm not sure why. On some level it was not wanting to bother these "pros" and I think also, a fear of the beat down. The old "don't quit your day job" line.

In art school I remember seeing a girl in the hall crying and I asked her what was wrong. She told me she had gotten a crit from the teacher and it was negative. I asked what was said.

"I asked him how I could improve it, he said I could roll it and smoke it!" then more tears.

In some nightmare version of my approaching a professional for critique I think I feared the worst.

So over the last year I have made an effort to ask for a critique from artists I admire, and for the most part the result has been the exact opposite. In fact so much so that it hasn't been really helpful in a lot of cases. "it all looks very nice, good luck with it"

while its great to be told how great your stuff is, you yourself can see 50 things wrong with it. is he lying to me? can he not see the flaws? I need help here!!

SOoo back to Eric Larsen. He came to a workshop on comics that I attend and looked through my work, made some (disapproving) grunts and sounds and then said something about it "being very nice" The instructor pushed on Eric to dig a bit,

a pause

and then Eric Larsen the Art Director took over. Not Eric Larsen pro talking to a fan.

He pointed out flaw after flaw. Took paper and traced parts of the page to showed how it should be, explained why certain things were sloppy. why some inking looked good on my page and why some looked terrible.

He then broke out 10 or so pages of art for the next savage dragon that he was working on in the coffee shop before he arrived. breakdowns, fully inked pages, pages with just the pencils done. It floored me.

Not because they were the best pages, or because I'm a huge fan, but because of the speed. Speed that came from doing a monthly book for decades. Comic pages are like solving a puzzle. how many panels, what size, what goes in them, and thats before you get to the trouble of if you can actually draw it. He has the experience to solve a page in a dozen ways. because he's solved that same puzzle hundreds of times!

It was so inspiring to see someone at that skill level in the field, and to be able to tap that knowledge for one of the best critiques I've ever gotten.
  • Mood: Neutral
  • Listening to: wub wub wub
  • Reading: marvel the untold story
  • Watching: dredd
  • Playing: dragon dogma
  • Eating: pizza
  • Drinking: coffee